Image Titlesort descending Duration (hours) Description
Advanced Interpersonal Communication: Communication Styles and Methods 0.75 To be successful in the workplace, you must be able to effectively communicate and cooperate with clients and co-workers. Learning about the four types of communication styles helps a listener understand a speaker’s perspective. It also helps a speaker understand how their communication affects the listener. In this course you will learn: to identify primary and secondary communication styles, and to communicate using various verbal and nonverbal modes of communication.
Advanced Interpersonal Communication: Communication Styles and Methods (Instructor Guide) 0.75 To be successful in the workplace, you must be able to effectively communicate and cooperate with clients and co-workers. Learning about the four types of communication styles helps a listener understand a speaker’s perspective. It also helps a speaker understand how their communication affects the listener. In this course you will learn: to identify primary and secondary communication styles, and to communicate using various verbal and nonverbal modes of communication. This Instructor's Edition of this course includes notes and suggestions to assist you in presenting the material, whether in an in-person classroom setting or as an instructor-led online or distance-learning course. It also provides you with the answers to questions found in mid-lesson activities, as well as in the quiz that concludes the course.
Advanced Interpersonal Communication: Customers and Vendors 0.50 Your customers include anyone who uses your company or organization to obtain goods and services. Customers might be internal or external. An internal customer is a member of your organization and can be a supervisor, colleague, or subordinate. An external customer is someone from outside your organization. Each customer is of equal importance, regardless of the amount of business that customer provides to your organization. You should provide the same level of quality goods and services all your customers, and all are equally deserving of efficient and effective communication. In this course you will learn: to respond to customers’ complaints, and to reject a vendor’s contract without rejecting the vendor, and address a complaint to a vendor.
Advanced Interpersonal Communication: Customers and Vendors (Instructor Guide) 0.50 Your customers include anyone who uses your company or organization to obtain goods and services. Customers might be internal or external. An internal customer is a member of your organization and can be a supervisor, colleague, or subordinate. An external customer is someone from outside your organization. Each customer is of equal importance, regardless of the amount of business that customer provides to your organization. You should provide the same level of quality goods and services all your customers, and all are equally deserving of efficient and effective communication. In this course you will learn: to respond to customers’ complaints, and to reject a vendor’s contract without rejecting the vendor, and address a complaint to a vendor. This Instructor's Edition of this course includes notes and suggestions to assist you in presenting the material, whether in an in-person classroom setting or as an instructor-led online or distance-learning course. It also provides you with the answers to questions found in mid-lesson activities, as well as in the quiz that concludes the course.
Advanced Interpersonal Communication: First Impressions and Building Rapport 0.67 Although it only takes 30 to 45 seconds to formulate a first impression, it often requires four or five additional encounters to change someone's first impression. Many times, once you've made a first impression, you will not have a second opportunity to change that impression. Therefore, it's important to make your best impression on the first try. In this course you will learn: to identify the elements that influence a first impression, to build rapport, and establish credibility with others, and to build positive relationships.
Advanced Interpersonal Communication: First Impressions and Building Rapport (Instructor Guide) 0.67 Although it only takes 30 to 45 seconds to formulate a first impression, it often requires four or five additional encounters to change someone's first impression. Many times, once you've made a first impression, you will not have a second opportunity to change that impression. Therefore, it's important to make your best impression on the first try. In this course you will learn: to identify the elements that influence a first impression, to build rapport, and establish credibility with others, and to build positive relationships. This Instructor's Edition of this course includes notes and suggestions to assist you in presenting the material, whether in an in-person classroom setting or as an instructor-led online or distance-learning course. It also provides you with the answers to questions found in mid-lesson activities, as well as in the quiz that concludes the course.
Advanced Interpersonal Communication: Organizational Culture 1.34 An organizational culture is the personality of an organization. This personality is both determined and accepted by the organization’s members. For example, an organization might have a culture that is youthful, energetic, and fast-paced. In this type of culture, decisions are made quickly, and employees are empowered to take action in a wide variety of situations. Another organization might be more straight-laced and policy-oriented. This organization would be much more formal and serious in the way it does business. It is important to recognize and understand the culture of an organization, so that you can determine your fit with the organization. In this course you will learn: to determine the nature of an organization’s culture, to use the cultural network to your advantage, and identify the characteristics of the roles exhibited in the network, to identify the elements of physical culture that affect interpersonal communication, and to identify the ways in which managers can build a positive culture.
Advanced Interpersonal Communication: Organizational Culture (Instructor Guide) 1.34 An organizational culture is the personality of an organization. This personality is both determined and accepted by the organization’s members. For example, an organization might have a culture that is youthful, energetic, and fast-paced. In this type of culture, decisions are made quickly, and employees are empowered to take action in a wide variety of situations. Another organization might be more straight-laced and policy-oriented. This organization would be much more formal and serious in the way it does business. It is important to recognize and understand the culture of an organization, so that you can determine your fit with the organization. In this course you will learn: to determine the nature of an organization’s culture, to use the cultural network to your advantage, and identify the characteristics of the roles exhibited in the network, to identify the elements of physical culture that affect interpersonal communication, and to identify the ways in which managers can build a positive culture. This Instructor's Edition of this course includes notes and suggestions to assist you in presenting the material, whether in an in-person classroom setting or as an instructor-led online or distance-learning course. It also provides you with the answers to questions found in mid-lesson activities, as well as in the quiz that concludes the course.
Advanced Interpersonal Communication: Supervisors 0.75 When you think of a supervisor, you probably think of your immediate boss. However, in the workplace, most people have several supervisors. Your workplace might be divided into teams, departments or divisions. Within each level, there is a supervisor to whom you are accountable, even if you do not deal with that person on a day-to-day basis. Company executives and board members can also be considered supervisors because they might have the power to make decisions regarding your employment, salary, promotions, and work assignments. It is important to communicate effectively with all of your supervisors to maintain an efficient workplace and to be able to promote your own ideas for improvements. In this course you will learn to: identify the types of ineffective supervisors and ways to interact with them, and negotiate a raise with a supervisor and offer an effective resignation.
Advanced Interpersonal Communication: Supervisors (Instructor Guide) 0.75 When you think of a supervisor, you probably think of your immediate boss. However, in the workplace, most people have several supervisors. Your workplace might be divided into teams, departments or divisions. Within each level, there is a supervisor to whom you are accountable, even if you do not deal with that person on a day-to-day basis. Company executives and board members can also be considered supervisors because they might have the power to make decisions regarding your employment, salary, promotions, and work assignments. It is important to communicate effectively with all of your supervisors to maintain an efficient workplace and to be able to promote your own ideas for improvements. In this course you will learn to: identify the types of ineffective supervisors and ways to interact with them, and negotiate a raise with a supervisor and offer an effective resignation. This Instructor's Edition of this course includes notes and suggestions to assist you in presenting the material, whether in an in-person classroom setting or as an instructor-led online or distance-learning course. It also provides you with the answers to questions found in mid-lesson activities, as well as in the quiz that concludes the course.

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